What causes achilles tendon pain after running?

Will Accessory Navicular Syndrome Require Surgery


Overview
An accessory navicular is defined as an extra bone in the foot, and oftentimes it causes moderate to severe discomfort. Depending on the severity, your doctor may recommend a non-surgical treatment to alleviate the pain, or surgery if treatment doesn?t decrease symptoms.

Accessory Navicular

Causes
Just having an accessory navicular bone is not necessarily a bad thing. Not all people with these accessory bones have symptoms. Symptoms arise when the accessory navicular is overly large or when an injury disrupts the fibrous tissue between the navicular and the accessory navicular. A very large accessory navicular can cause a bump on the instep that rubs on your shoe causing pain.

Symptoms
What are the signs/symptoms of Accessory Navicular Syndrome? Pain in the foot following trauma (such as after an ankle sprain) Chronic irritation from shoes or other footwear rubbing against the bone. A visible bony prominence on the inner side of the foot just above the arch. Redness and swelling of that area. Vague pain or throbbing in the arch mostly occuring during or after periods of physical activity. Symptoms appear most often during adolescence, but some may not occur until adulthood.

Diagnosis
It is important to examine the posterior tibial tendon and measure the extent of pain to this tendon proximal to the navicular bone. You can clinically determine the amount of posterior tibial tendon involvement by assessing the degree of swelling, pain on palpation and strength. To evaluate the patient?s strength, have the patient stand and balance on one foot along with rising up on his or her toes.

Non Surgical Treatment
Treating accessory navicular syndrome is focused on relieving symptoms. Some treatment methods are Icing to reduce swelling. Immobilization with a cast or walking boot to reduce inflammation and promote healing. Medications to reduce pain and inflammation. Physical therapy to strengthen muscles. Orthotics to support the arch. Surgery may be needed to remove the accessory bone and reshape the area if other methods are not successful.

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Surgical Treatment
Fusion of the accessory navicular to the navicular with screws is required when there is a large accessory navicular bone and removal of this bone would reduce the articular surface of the Navicular to the talus (coxa pedis). Fusion will relieve pain without disrupting the tibialis posterior tendon insertion nor narrowing talar head support. In most instances, a patient’s recovery will be as follows. 0-6 weeks: Immobilization (in case or cast boot) non-weight-bearing or touch weight-bearing. 6-10 weeks: Increasing activity in a cast boot. Physical therapy to work on strength and balance. Full recovery after 9 weeks-2 months. In some patients (where the posterior tibial tendon Why is my Achilles tendon burning? still intact and functioning) the treating surgeon may allow weight-bearing as tolerated in a cast boot immediately after surgery.

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برچسب: What is leg length discrepancy?، Why is my Achilles tendon burning?، What causes the heels of your feet to burn?،
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Recovery Time After Accessory Navicular Surgery


Overview
The accessory navicular (os navicularum or os tibiale externum) is an extra bone or piece of cartilage located on the inner side of the foot just above the arch. It is incorporated within the posterior tibial tendon, which attaches in this area. An accessory navicular is congenital (present at birth). It is not part of normal bone structure and therefore is not present in most people. People who have an accessory navicular often Where are the femur tibia and fibula? unaware of the condition if it causes no problems. However, some people with this extra bone develop a painful condition known as accessory navicular syndrome when the bone and/or posterior tibial tendon are aggravated. Many people with accessory navicular syndrome also have flat feet (fallen arches). Having a flat foot puts more strain on the posterior tibial tendon, which can produce inflammation or irritation of the accessory navicular.

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Causes
This painful foot condition is caused by an extra bone in the foot called the accessory navicular. Only about 10% of people have this bone (4 to 21%), and not all of them will develop any symptoms. The navicular bone is one of the normal tarsal bones of the foot. It is located on the inside of the foot, at the arch.

Symptoms
Perhaps the most common of the extra bones in the foot, the accessory navicular bone is estimated to be present in 7 to 19 percent of the population. Zadek and Gold maintained that the bone persisted as a distinct, separate bone in 2 percent of the population. Also be aware that the accessory bone normally fuses completely or incompletely to the navicular. It is this incomplete fusion which allows for micromotion, which, in turn, may cause degenerative changes that can also contribute to the pain.

Diagnosis
An initial assessment is an orthopaedic office begins with a thorough history and complete physical exam, including an assessment of the posterior tibial tendon and areas of tenderness. Associated misalignments of the ankle and foot should be noted. Finally, weight-bearing x-rays of the foot will help in making the diagnosis. Sometimes, an MRI may be needed to see if the posterior tibial tendon is involved with the symptoms or getting more clarity on the anatomy of the accessory navicular.

Non Surgical Treatment
The goal of non-surgical treatment for accessory navicular syndrome is to relieve the symptoms. The following may be used. Immobilization. Placing the foot in a cast or removable walking boot allows the affected area to rest and decreases the inflammation. Ice. To reduce swelling, a bag of ice covered with a thin towel is applied to the affected area. Do not put ice directly on the skin. Oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, may be prescribed. In some cases, oral or injected steroid medications may be used in combination with immobilization to reduce pain and inflammation. Physical therapy may be prescribed, including exercises and treatments to strengthen the muscles and decrease inflammation. The exercises may also help prevent recurrence of the symptoms. Custom orthotic devices that fit into the shoe provide support for the arch, and may play a role in preventing future symptoms. Even after successful treatment, the symptoms of accessory navicular syndrome sometimes reappear. When this happens, non-surgical approaches are usually repeated.

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Surgical Treatment
After the anesthesia is administered you will be heavily sedated and placed on your stomach. Surgeons will place a tourniquet around your thigh and an incision will be made on the inside of the foot. The posterior tibial tendon will be moved as necessary and the accessory navicular will be removed. Surgeons will repair the posterior tibial tendon with sutures or suture anchors, and the wound will be closed. A splint will be placed on the foot for stabilization and immobilization. You will be permitted to leave the surgical center once you have been cleared by the anesthesiologist. Plan ahead to have a friend or family member take your prescription to a pharmacy to pick up your post-op medication. Use narcotic pain medications before bed or if numbness in your foot begins to dull. Schedule a post-op visit for 4 weeks after the procedure.

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برچسب: How do I stretch my Achilles tendon?، What is limb lengthening surgery?، What do you do for a sore Achilles tendon?،
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